Category: Daito Ryu Aiki Jujutsu

Is a martial arts studio a profitable business? By William Stynetski

So you start out with a space to teach in. By the time you get enough students to actually cover the costs of running that place, you have already outgrown that first training dojo.

So now you need a bigger place. Which is going to cost more, so you will need more students.

On average it takes about 10 years to actually have and maintain a solid base of 30 students. As an example lets say that means during those first 10 years you might have 100 potential students come through your doors, but only about 30 of them will stay long term.

If you are charging $100 a month thats $3,000 a month you are bringing in. $3,000 a month is not a lot of money considsring that at that point, you will probably need to move into a bigger space.

That’s just the first 10 years. The first 3–5 years you will be lucky to get 10–15 students, for $1,000 to $1,500 a month. During that time you will have a small dojo, and probably be fronting much of the costs yourself.

Then you have to consider that people move, or change jobs, or have a baby, or grow up and go to college, or get involved with video games and cars and girls and tons of school activites. My biggest competition? Video games.

Then most kids and adults come to find out that studying martial arts is a lot of work (yes moving the body somehow equates to work these days) and a commitment of time. Progressing and sticking around to get a blackbelt or maybe actually learn a particular art or style can lose its appeal, despite all of the benifits of training in a martial art.

Not to say it cannot be done, but If you are actually teaching a martial art (as opposed to running an after school day care program disguised as a martial art), and you take all of this into consideration, you can probably forget about seeing any kind of a profit, especially in those first 10 years. You will be very lucky just to break even.

 

https://www.quora.com/Is-a-martial-arts-studio-a-profitable-business/answer/William-Stynetski

How is a bokken used to train a samurai by lessening the injuries that would be induced by a real sword?

Good bokkens are about the same length and weight of a real sword, and can be very expensive. These good ones are even crafted in the tradition of the sword system studied.

For instance this one at $85.00 from Tozando, in the style of the sword used by Yakumaru Jigen Ryu.Yakumaru Jigen Ryu - William Stynetski

Ok, so $85.00 isn’t really all that expensive. Take this one for an example of an expensive bokken, also from Tozando.William Stynetski - Facts Bokken

It is a Deluxe Loquat Bokken, and the price is $1,045.59. Prices for bokken can fall anywhere from $10 to much, much higher as you can see.

As far as lessening injuries go, about the only thing a wooden bokken will not do is cut or slice human flesh.

Other than that, the bokken is an extremely dangerous weapon. With enough force, a bokken can still stab through soft targets, like the solar plexus, throat and eyes.

And with even less force can break and shatter bones of the fingers and hand. With a little more force these weapons can break arms, ribs and skulls.

So in a sense, yes, a person training with wooden weapons will not have to pick up their sliced off body parts off the ground, or get stitches, but a few weeks in a cast could definately be a possibility.

As could death. I can tell you, even a light and accidental hit with one of these really hurts.

Wearing armour, as samurai did on the battlefield, during training will lessen the damage taken, but in the hands of a skilled swordsman that samurai undergoing training will definately feel it when a mistake is made. Even then, the hands, fingers, and especially the thumb is a desired and usually exposed target.

These are real weapons, and the beauty is they don’t have to be used like a sword. Afterall, it is a piece of wood, and it can also be used like a short staff, but yes they hurt. Yes they can cause damage, and yes they can even cause death.

  • William Stynetski

https://www.quora.com/How-is-a-bokken-used-to-train-a-samurai-by-lessening-the-injuries-that-would-be-induced-by-a-real-sword/answer/William-Stynetski

Use of Pain Compliance in Martial Arts and Self Defense

I wouldn’t say it is total horse manuer. However, one should be aware of a few factors ahead of time before relying solely on pain compliance when defending yourself.

The first is the adrenaline pumping through the body. If flight has not taken place, and fight has, adrenaline can be a great pain killer.

Adrenaline can also be a driving force in a fight. This can also take one way past pain in a fight.

Another factor that comes to mind is the will to survive. People can, and have fought with broken noses, arms, legs, skulls, ribs and well just about anything else that can break, split, or rupture.Wikipedia Pain Compliance - williamstynetski.com

Something else to consider is that everybody is different. Pain receptors and nerves are different in people. What could be deemed effective on one individual may completely backfire when tried on another individual due to the sheer fact that people have different body structures in addition to different tolerance levels for pain.

Finally you have to consider drugs and alchohol.  If the attacker or person you are defending yourself against is drunk or on drugs, their body may not process pain at all.

The human body and its instinct and will to survive is an amazing thing. Inflicting pain on another person and “waiting” to see if they comply or not should not be your only option.

William Stynetski

https://www.quora.com/Why-is-pain-compliance-total-horseshit-in-real-combat/answer/William-Stynetski

Tanto Waza at Aikido Plano Dojo (bladed weapon application)

Aikido comes from a long history of many different styles of jujutsu. Although not always in line with the accepted underlying philosophies of aikido, it is important to understand where aikido comes from. As such, every now and then my own exposure to traditional jujutsu does get mixed in with my aikido classes.

This is some tanto waza, or knife technique.  Not defending against a knife, but defending against a potentially life ending kick from the attacker.

Here we are not concerned with justifying the use of deadly force or how much force is acceptable under current law.  In this case, these techniques were designed to dispose of an enemy on the battlefield as quickly as possible, and we practice them through completion of the kata.

William Stynetski

 

Aikido Hanka Waza and Sutemi Waza – Yokomenuchi Koshinage Hanka Yoko Otoshi

Nice example of using a hanka waza to sutemi waza when a koshinage does not quite pan out.  My uke here has about 75 pounds on me, and in aikido application, there should not be a struggle to make a technique work.

 

Blast From the Past

Came across this old photo the other day. That’s me in the middle.

Aikido Plano Dojo Me and 2 Shihan

To my right, Shihan Sosa, and to my left Shihan Park.

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