Category: Military Strategy

How does a soldier fight an enemy that he cannot see?

This is one of the areas where Sun Tzu’s advice in Art of War really comes into play. Know youself and you will win 50% of your battles. Know your enemy and you will win 50% of your battles. Know yourself and your enemy and you will win 100% of the time.

In todays modern age of technology it makes it very hard to remain unseen on the battlefield for very long. So one can stay hidden, but for how long is a real concern among troops wishing to remain unseen.

Before the invention of radars blind soldiers were used to listen for approaching aircraft that were still out of sight.

Aside from satellite, various detection devices and cameras, the methods used to locate an unseen enemy come in small stages of getting to know your enemy. You start to learn certain habits and patterns and then find ways to exploit those.

Skills like tracking, intelligence gathering, laying traps and ambushes all become part of an overall strategy to locate and flush out the enemy. Takes a little time, in some cases a lot of time and patience, especially if the enemy is good at remaining unseen while still engaging on the battlefield, but these are some of the methods put into practice.

https://www.quora.com/How-does-a-soldier-fight-an-enemy-that-he-cannot-see/answer/William-Stynetski

Why do countries publicize their military inventory nowadays? Shouldn’t it be a secret?

I was asked to answer this on Quora by Quora member Paolo Anderson today.

Paolo, thanks for asking me to answer your question.

Much of it does stay classified, even if the platform is known. For instance with aircraft carriers, no big secret, but its top speed and range remain classified aspects of that platform.

Even then, some of those secrets don’t stay secret for long. Satellite and other forms of intel gathering and espionage have their place and can be effective, even if the information gathered about a platform is limited in scope.

The older systems tend to have more information out there than newer systems and capabilities. New weapons platforms in the research and development stage are highly classified. However once those systems become operational, efforts to collect intel and data on those new systems begins.

Remember the stealth bombers? Those were a big secret once upon a time. They are not such a big secret any longer, but much of their capabilities still are classified.

B-2 Stealth williamstynetski.com

What does stay classified are the TT&P, or the Techniques, Tactics and Procedures in which those weapons are deployed and employed in theatre. The where, when and how. So even if the capabilities of a weapon system are known, the element of surprise can still, hopefully to some degree, be exercised.

Even then, there will be a combination of different weapon platforms used in conjunction to achieve mission success on the battlefield. Then you have the added benifit of a show of force and capability to hopefully deter future hostilities. In this case, it isn’t so much about the platform itself, and how much of it is known (numbers, capabilities, results) but the how and when it is used. Once that gets out, any enemy force, or future enemy force has to begin to consider and train other alternatives and scenarios. Then, once that happens, we continue our intel gathering on those changes in their training methods, and the cycle continues.

So things stay secret, until they are not secret any longer.

  • William Stynetski

 

https://www.quora.com/Why-do-country-publicise-their-military-inventory-nowadays-Shouldnt-it-be-a-secret/answer/William-Stynetski

How Do You Fight Defensive Battles?

It is all relative. There can be no defense without offense, and no offense without defense. They are inseperable.

Battles are very fluid. There are constant changes taking place from moment to moment. Makes no difference if these changes are realized at a troop or command level or not. They are taking place.

Some of these changes could be so minor as to be insignificant, and others could be major changes on the battlefield in terms of troop numbers, armament, equipment, and position.

The key is being able to recognize and discern which changes illicit a response or reaction. Not always easy to do, cosidering that some of the most experienced generals on a battlefield have lost battles either by not recognizing these changes, or by issuing orders that resulted in an incorrect response to those changes.

Next it comes down to how well trained and fluid your own forces are. Remember the saying the key to a good offense is a good defense? Well the same holds true for defense. The key to a good defense is a good offense, and preferably, in this case, one that is swift, powerful, and completely unexpected.

The question then is: At what point does this change take place? When does the defensive battle become more of an offensive battle, and to what degree(s)? It is all very much yin and yang.

How defensive do you want to be? Are your troops so defensive that they will not deal with any threat until the first shot is fired? Or is there enough autonomy to handle actual and percieved threats as those threats are forming and taking shape before the repercussions of those threats are introduced into the battle?

As stated earlier, position is a key element. Does this current defensive position also offer the opportunity to fluidly go into offensive maneuvers when the time arises?

That pretty much is the key. Being able to fluidly switch from one to the other, and knowing when to do so.

Of course this goes full circle to offense and defense are inseperable. They are really one and the same. It is how and when the strategies and tactics of each (for the purposes of this discussion) are used in a battle, and to what degree.

William Stynetski

https://www.quora.com/How-do-you-fight-defensive-battles#mwebmodal-0