Category: Self Defense

Tanto Waza at Aikido Plano Dojo (bladed weapon application)

Aikido comes from a long history of many different styles of jujutsu. Although not always in line with the accepted underlying philosophies of aikido, it is important to understand where aikido comes from. As such, every now and then my own exposure to traditional jujutsu does get mixed in with my aikido classes.

This is some tanto waza, or knife technique.  Not defending against a knife, but defending against a potentially life ending kick from the attacker.

Here we are not concerned with justifying the use of deadly force or how much force is acceptable under current law.  In this case, these techniques were designed to dispose of an enemy on the battlefield as quickly as possible, and we practice them through completion of the kata.

William Stynetski

 

Aikido Hanka Waza and Sutemi Waza – Yokomenuchi Koshinage Hanka Yoko Otoshi

Nice example of using a hanka waza to sutemi waza when a koshinage does not quite pan out.  My uke here has about 75 pounds on me, and in aikido application, there should not be a struggle to make a technique work.

 

Blast From the Past

Came across this old photo the other day. That’s me in the middle.

Aikido Plano Dojo Me and 2 Shihan

To my right, Shihan Sosa, and to my left Shihan Park.

https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=1524854960929350&substory_index=0&id=850385068376346

Are adults allowed to strike children in martial arts?

I hit mine all the time to show where and how they are open.

It isn’t a death blow, if it is to the face, it is a tap on the forehead. I have also used a fist making connection to the jaw line, again not a strike per say, but I simply place my fist along their jaw and keep it their a couple of seconds. I may also use it to push through, turning their head a bit.

For the body it is a little different. I usually will target the ribs or the chest, and use just enough force for them to squirm if it is to the ribs, and a decent little thump if it is to the chest. To the chest, I am not looking for any kind of force or power, but more wanting the nice thud sound effect.82bbcd1a7e1621a0db451a5f2c4a3ee3

At the same time I show them how to correct their position to reduce the chances of being hit again. It may take a few times, but eventually they get it.

I also encourage them to strike me from time to time exposing my own openings to them (or what would be the openings of a potential attacker).

This does not always fare so well for me, because they have not yet learned to control their power, but so be it.

William Stynetski

https://www.quora.com/Are-adults-allowed-to-strike-children-in-martial-arts/answer/William-Stynetski

How Do You Fight Defensive Battles?

It is all relative. There can be no defense without offense, and no offense without defense. They are inseperable.

Battles are very fluid. There are constant changes taking place from moment to moment. Makes no difference if these changes are realized at a troop or command level or not. They are taking place.

Some of these changes could be so minor as to be insignificant, and others could be major changes on the battlefield in terms of troop numbers, armament, equipment, and position.

The key is being able to recognize and discern which changes illicit a response or reaction. Not always easy to do, cosidering that some of the most experienced generals on a battlefield have lost battles either by not recognizing these changes, or by issuing orders that resulted in an incorrect response to those changes.

Next it comes down to how well trained and fluid your own forces are. Remember the saying the key to a good offense is a good defense? Well the same holds true for defense. The key to a good defense is a good offense, and preferably, in this case, one that is swift, powerful, and completely unexpected.

The question then is: At what point does this change take place? When does the defensive battle become more of an offensive battle, and to what degree(s)? It is all very much yin and yang.

How defensive do you want to be? Are your troops so defensive that they will not deal with any threat until the first shot is fired? Or is there enough autonomy to handle actual and percieved threats as those threats are forming and taking shape before the repercussions of those threats are introduced into the battle?

As stated earlier, position is a key element. Does this current defensive position also offer the opportunity to fluidly go into offensive maneuvers when the time arises?

That pretty much is the key. Being able to fluidly switch from one to the other, and knowing when to do so.

Of course this goes full circle to offense and defense are inseperable. They are really one and the same. It is how and when the strategies and tactics of each (for the purposes of this discussion) are used in a battle, and to what degree.

William Stynetski

https://www.quora.com/How-do-you-fight-defensive-battles#mwebmodal-0

Fun With Shihonage

While practicing kata te tori ai hamni shihonage I get to stress the importance of moving correctly from the first touch, and have a little fun with this young aikidoka.

Shihonage is a difficult technique to do efficiently and correctly.

There is a wealth of information gleaned from that first moment of contact. Being open and sensitive to it is key on both sides, for uke and nage.

Then, being able to move, adjust and fit your body in a way that utilizes and takes advantage of that information (the attackers position and movement, their intentions, their structure…) must also be facilitated.

All in an instant.