Tag: Yin and Yang

Henry Kono Aikido

I didn’t get to train with Henry (he did not like to be called sensei) as long as some of his other students.  Like his other students, though, his insight and teaching of aikido left a lasting and profound impact on those he taught, myself included.

It forever changed the way I approach both my aikido and martial arts training.

Somewhere I have some video of Henry.  Not doing aikido on the mats, but a rare capture of some time on a short break off the mats.  When I find it. i will share it here.  For now, enjoy this wonderful article:

http://feministaikidoka.blogspot.com/2016/08/remembering-henry-kono.html?m=1

Henry Kono

William Stynetski

Aikido Hanka Waza and Sutemi Waza – Yokomenuchi Koshinage Hanka Yoko Otoshi

Nice example of using a hanka waza to sutemi waza when a koshinage does not quite pan out.  My uke here has about 75 pounds on me, and in aikido application, there should not be a struggle to make a technique work.

 

Yin Yang Described, by William Stynetski

How Would You Describe Yin and Yang?

They are two different and inseperable states of being, of energy.

Think of a large wave rolling up onto shore. As the wave crashes onto the shore washing up seaweed and driftwood, this is yang.

That same wave, as it recedes and goes back out to sea is yin. It still has power and force, just in a different direction/manner.

It is powerful enough to take that same driftwood back out to sea, or carry a person caught in its undertow miles away from shore.

Hot is yang…enough to boil water.

Cold is yin…enough to freeze water.

Hot water releases steam which can be ussd as energy.

Freezing water expands as it freezes and this expansion also has a force of its own. Think of water entering a geologic fissure and then freezing, causing a fracture in a rock formation.

Yin is just as powerful as yang, just in a different way.

As a sidenote, the expansion of the freezing water technically is a yang feature, and is an example of what is meant when you hear that there is yang within yin and yin within yang. In this instance the freezing water is yin, and the resulting force of the expansion of the freezing water is the yang within yin.

This is represented, in the yin and yang symbol, by the black dot in the white half of the circle (yin within yang), and in the case of yang within yin (expansion of freezing water), the white dot in the black half of the circle.

It is always a state of flux, waxing or waning, and nothing can be completely either 100% yin, or 100% yang.

-William Stynetski

https://www.quora.com/How-would-you-describe-Yin-and-Yang/answer/William-Stynetski